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20130127
20130127
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
the ministry. >> two years ago, the protests in egypt led to the overthrow of hosni mubarak. what impact do you think these protests might have that we're seeing now? >> president morsi and the muslim brotherhood will be nervous about what they have seen today. it is important to say while there is disillusionment, things have not gone as people fought -- thought he debuts ago. the pace of change has not been great. we're talking about a split between the liberals and those in the support the brotherhood on the other. it is the liberals who are mainly taking to the streets today. two years ago, we saw all of egypt coming out onto the streets. another half is sitting at home saying there has been an election. our side won. why are you on the streets? the president says give me time. i have had seven months on the job. people say he has had time. they worry about the agenda being pushed. they do not want the state to be made at the beginning. what is difficult to see is how the two sites will be brought together. neither the authorities nor opposition have come up with a clear vision as to how to
the scenes back then. this was a country united behind one goal, to topple the dictator hosni mubarak but two years on this country is divided, polarized and for the first time many people here fear the violence is actually threatening the country's very stability. the chaotic moments when anger turned deadly in port saeed. outside the city's jail, dozens were killed as protesters tried to storm it to free prisoners who minutes earlier were sentenced to death in cairo. 21 defendants were convicted for their part in a soccer stadium massacre that killed more than 70 fans one year ago. the verdict was read and relatives of those killed last year showed grief and joy. for them the ruling was just. an investigation concluded last year's deadly rampage was not a spontaneous outburst of crowd violence. many believed it was a conspiracy to kill supporters of a popular soccer team whose fans have been at the forefront of egypt's revolution. a revolution that marked its second anniversary yesterday with deadly clashes in cairo and other cities, a scene quite different than two years ago. under pressur
been controversy that we are sending f-16s over a deal made with then-president hosni mubarak in 2010. is that our best move? >> this is confusing in a lot of ways from what the president's agenda. what is the president's goal in the middle-east? what is the president's goal throughout the world with the fight on terrorism? i think there are so many mixed messages that it's hard to understand what is the strategy here? how are we going to control terrorism whether it's in afghanistan or the middle-east or in iran? so to be sending f-16s into the middle-east at this time, again sends a message, are we going to lead or lead from behind. >> congresswoman, if we cut off aid to egypt at this point, we are going on cut off an important rale relationship? >> this is not just about aid. this is about some very sophisticated military weapon systems in the hands a government at this particular point that we are not really sure how effective they are going to be. i mean... part of it is the congress's fault. it is not just the president, you know, following through on what was in place for egypt
in the book, a fundamental central player to the egyptian revolution that overthrew hosni mubarak, and their response to the port say yesterday soccer riot is a very interesting part of what's taking place right there. the focus on the police as opposed to going after other souk soccer clubs and the third thing, and i don't think once again this has been talked about nearly enough, has been the historic -- no matter what one things about president obama, the historic nature of electing the first african-american president in 2008 had an effect of raising the confidence of athletes, particularly african-american athletes. >> that brings me to my second question. >> yeah. >> there's been tremendous pressure on athletes to essentially shut up and play unless they are endorsing something. >> exactly. >> and an increasing number of athletes don't seem to be separating their politics from the profession. this is a recent example, a power forward for the nba's denver nuggets. take a look and i want to talk about this on the other side. >> my mom to my right is mahassan and my mom to the
to the overthrow of former president hosni mubarak. >> in the meantime, new peace talks are underway in syria now about ending the ongoing violence in that country. the head of the united nations humanitarian agency arriving in damascus this evening. she will be meeting with syrian officials from the foreign ministry during a two-day visit there. her third since the conflict began back in 2011. since then, more than 60,000 have been killed, millions of others have been either forced from their homes or they live at the crossroads of constant fighting between rebels and government forces. >> well, gregg, back home now, illinois joining a growing list of states that will soon allow illegal immigrants to get a driver's license. governor pat quinn expected to sign the bill into law today. supporters say the proposal is a matter of public safety and facial recognition technology will help prevent fraud there are critics and those critics say that there have been hundreds of fraud cases, in fact, in the three other states that do allow undocumented immigrants to drive. those being new mexico, washingto
to death for the riot, and the uprising brought down hosni mubarak. terrible news for taxpayers in illinois, standard & poor's downgrading that state's credit rating from a to a-minus and potential to fall further and last in the united states. and for taxpayers means a 95 million dollar hit to their wallet, ainsley. >> ainsley: thank you, tucker, from fallen sports stars to reality tv. we're living in a world of deception. >> clayton: why is it when lance armstrong, manti te'o caught lying there's so much outrage? and joining us from the fox medical a-team, dr. keith ablow. >> ainsley: hey, dr. ablow. >> clayton: yeah, do we hear-- >> can we hear you? >> i mope you can hear me. >> clayton: nice to see you, doc, early morning and we're getting the audio kinks worked out. let's talk about manti te'o and told them up in high regard and wearing jerseys and holding them up like heroes and a fall from grace, and are we're sort of shocked by it. should we be shocked by it? >> i'm glad we're still shocked by it it, it's more pervasive than ever and a kind of epidemic, we're losing as a culture our
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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